Let's all enjoy more mouth-to-mouth prophecies

June 12, 2008

Remember the history student who proclaimed "the slave trade was one of those institutions that seems like a marvellous idea at the time"?

What about the theology student who concluded that "mouth-to-mouth prophecy was no longer effective" or the law student who thought "devilled work" was "a type of Creole cookery".

Times Higher Education is proud to announce the revival of an old tradition belonging to the summer months - its student "exam howler" competition. Readers are invited to send in examples of the wit and wisdom of their students - protecting their identities, of course. A magnum of champagne will be given to the submitter of the winning entry.

Previous competitions have produced gems such as the student who shed new light on the likely effects on cattle of bovine spongiform encephalopathy: "Their language has no deeper meaning ... cows just moo for the sake of it."

There was also the would-be developmental psychologist's assertion that "if a child is left out for more than 20 hours a day it would have a devastating effect on the child's development".

Equally memorable was a dietary interpretation of the New Testament's 40 days in the wilderness: "Christ's temptation in the dessert."

- Send entries to rebecca.attwood@tsleducation.com and provide your contact details.

登录 或者 注册 以便阅读全文。

请先注册再进行下一步

获得一个月的无限制地在线阅读网站内容。只需注册并完成您的职业简介.

注册是免费的,而且非常简单。一旦成功注册,您可以每个月免费阅读3篇文章。:

  • 获得编辑推荐文章
  • 率先获得泰晤士高等教育世界大学排名相关的新闻
  • 获得职位推荐、筛选工作和保存工作搜索结果
  • 参与读者讨论和公布评论
注册

欢迎反馈

Log in or register to post comments

评论最多

赞助