Building a global network

June 18, 2015

The article on allowing British students to use state loans for fees abroad struck a chord with me (“David Willetts: allow student loans to be used abroad”, 2 June).

I, too, spoke at the British Council’s Going Global conference on a subject I am passionate about: how universities are the enablers of the creative economy, not just in the UK but also on the international stage. As a strong advocate of global education, I agree with Willetts’ premise of students using their loan to study abroad. At Bath Spa University, we strive to give our students opportunities to form international networks in the firm belief that as graduates they can confidently work in any country of the world. Our Global Citizenship programme provides funded opportunities for students to undertake an international placement as part of their undergraduate degree. If they were able to use their student loan to fund a year, or even two, at an international institution, our students would develop more robust skills and experience before entering the global employment market. As the world economy becomes more connected, so must higher education.

Christina Slade
Vice-chancellor, Bath Spa University

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

United Nations peace keeper

Understanding the unwritten rules of graduate study is vital if you want to get the most from your PhD supervision, say Kevin O'Gorman and Robert MacIntosh

David Parkins Christmas illustration (22 December 2016)

A Dickensian tale, set in today’s university

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration (5 January 2017)

Fixing problems in the academic job market by reducing the number of PhDs would homogenise the sector, argues Tom Cutterham

Houses of Parliament, Westminster, government

There really is no need for the Higher Education and Research Bill, says Anne Sheppard

poi, circus

Kate Riegle van West had to battle to bring her circus life and her academic life together