Top 10 Academic Bestsellers - Blackwell, Bristol

June 19, 2008

1. Pass Finals: A Companion to Kumar and Clark's Clinical Medicine, Second Edition by Geoff Smith, Elizabeth Carty and Louise Langmead. Elsevier, £22.99. ISBN 9780702028779

2. The Kingdom of Infinite Space: A Fantastical Journey around Your Head by Raymond Tallis. Atlantic Books, £19.99. ISBN 9781843546696

3. Blackstone's Student Police Officer Handbook, Second Edition edited by Robin Bryant. Oxford University Press, £29.95. ISBN 9780199238415

4. Crash Course: Endocrine and Reproductive Systems, Third Edition by Alexander Finlayson. Mosby, £21.99. ISBN 97807234346

5. Crash Course: General Medicine, Second Edition by R. Parker, A. Sharma, W. Yeo and J. Rees. Mosby, £22.99. ISBN 9780723433316

6. Edward VI: The Lost King of England by Chris Skidmore. Phoenix Books, £8.99. ISBN 9780753823514

7. Crash Course: Pathology, Third Edition by Atul Anand. Mosby, £21.99. ISBN 9780723434221

8. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, Seventeenth Edition by Anthony Fauci, Eugene Braunwald, Dennis Kasper, Stephen Hauser, Dan Longo, J. Jameson and Joseph Loscalzo. McGraw-Hill, £99.00. ISBN 9780071466332

9. Crash Course: Infectious Diseases by Emma Nickerson. Mosby, £21.99. ISBN 9780723433873

10. Crash Course: Anatomy, Third Edition by Michael I. Dykes and William Watson. Mosby, £21.99. ISBN 9780723434177

Blackwell. 89 Park Street. Bristol BS1 5PW. www.blackwell.co.uk.

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