Student review: Selwyn's Law of Employment

November 8, 2012

Author: Astra Emir

Edition: Seventeenth

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Pages: 792

Price: £34.99

ISBN: 9780199640263

Selwyn's Law of Employment has long been a market leader among employment law textbooks. It is now in its 17th edition and there is one fundamental change from previous editions - Astra Emir has taken over from the late Norman Selwyn as author. The main aim of the text, however, is the same as it has always been: to provide a clear and detailed view of the main principles of employment law in practice. In this, it is largely successful.

Split into 23 distinct chapters that focus on everything from equality in employment law to law relating to trade unions, the text is clearly written, makes good use of footnotes and is presented in a succinct way, meaning the reader can quickly access the area of employment law being searched for. The book also does an admirable job of incorporating both European Union law and domestic law into the same topics, without overcomplicating the particular area.

The book is a fantastic resource for undergraduates and those in practice wanting answers to problems of law, and would also be excellent for someone researching for a moot on employment law, as the contents pages and index are well set out. In short, the law is put as concisely as possible without any oversimplification and the book does great justice to the substantive elements of employment law.

Where the book fails is with the theoretical side of employment law. If one is looking for the most up-to-date law on equal pay then it can be found quickly here, but as to why the law is that way, and the arguments and debates around the current law, this text offers little help. However, it should be noted that the book makes no claim that it can help with these matters.

The new edition once again comes with access to Oxford University Press' handy online resource centre. This is designed to provide the reader with useful information on updates to the law since the text was published. At the time of writing this article there were no updates on the resource centre site, which offers assurance that Emir has included all the most recent developments in employment law within the published text.

Who is it for? Employment law students and practitioners.

Presentation: Concise and easy to follow, making it straightforward to find what you're looking for.

Would you recommend it? Absolutely. For those looking into practical employment law problems, Selwyn's is a must.

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