Turning turtles

January 7, 2010

The journeys of two marine turtles around the world's oceans are being followed online in new research. Noelle and Darwinia are two adult female leatherback turtles that nest in Gabon, western central Africa. A team at the University of Exeter has fitted each turtle with a small satellite tracking device that enables the scientists to monitor their precise movements and observe where and how deep they dive. Matthew Witt, a member of the project team based at Exeter's Cornwall campus, said: "Our aim is that this will help inform management of fisheries and mineral exploration, as well as feeding into ambitious plans to widen the network of marine protected areas in Gabon. It is only by having detailed information on where these creatures go that we can try to protect them." The project has been funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs' Darwin Initiative.

http://tinyurl.com/ybw5q8n.

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