School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine - Anglo-Indian advantage

May 20, 2010

British Indian children have substantially better mental health than their white British counterparts, according to a study. Researchers from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine used data from the 1999 and 2004 British Child and Adolescent Mental Health surveys, which took nationwide samples of 5-16-year-olds living in England. The proportion of Indian children with a mental health disorder was 3.7 per cent, the lowest of any major ethnic group and substantially lower than the 10 per cent reported in white children. Part of the Indian mental health advantage was explained by the fact that Indian children had higher academic attainment and were more likely to come from two-parent families.

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