Average graduate applies for 12 jobs before landing one, survey claims

Poll also highlights growing importance of online profile

March 15, 2014

Job interview careers

Source: Shutterstock

Graduates apply for 12 jobs on average before getting their first role, according to a survey.

To add to their frustration, one in four receive no feedback whatsoever from unsuccessful applications, according to the poll of 2,000 UK students and graduates commissioned by the professional networking site LinkedIn.

The survey also says that almost two-thirds of students (65 per cent) feel they are not ready for the world of work and more than half (52 per cent) say universities do not teach students the skills they need to find a job.

The Students Have Your Say Survey, conducted in mid-February, also found that four in 10 respondents believed that having a good online profile was just as or more important than having a good CV.

Charles Hardy, higher education specialist at LinkedIn, which now has 15 million UK members, said students need an active online presence to gain their first job, which will help them connect with professionals who may be able to offer them a job.

“We are already working closely with schools and universities, helping to educate students on the tools available to them to help with career mapping and job hunting,” Mr Hardy said.

jack.grove@tsleducation.com

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