Symposium Bursaries - New perspectives on mitochondrial biology

Deadline: 01/08/2006

April 10, 2006

Aims to enable young scientists to attend Novartis Foundation symposia and spend four weeks in the department of one of the symposium participants. Award: (a) travel expenses to symposium and host laboratory (b) board and lodgings for the duration of the bursary. Applicants must be aged between 23-35 years on the closing date for application. It is essential that they be actively engaged in research on the topic covered by the symposium. They should not already have accepted an invitation to participate in that symposium.

Symposium: New perspectives on mitochondrial biology
Date: 28-30 November 2006


Details here
Contact: The Bursary Scheme Administrator
Address: The Novartis Foundation
41 Portland Place
London W1B 1BN
Telephone: 020 7636 9456
Fax: 020 7636 2840
Email: bursary@novartisfound.org.uk

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