Ignorant firms neglect training

May 19, 1995

A lack of hard information on the benefits of training might explain why many British companies show a reluctance to devote resources to improving staff skills, according to a survey by the Brighton-based Institute of Employment Studies.

The report, Measuring The Effectiveness Of Training, reveals that only 25 per cent of employers are satisfied with the evaluation of training and development, and nearly half dissatisfied. It says that there is "a rather vague perception of the value of training programmes and a reliance on 'acts of faith' rather than clear analysis".

Author Mark Spilsbury said: "Employers are concerned to maximise returns on their investments. However, there is still little attempt to ensure that spending on training is money well spent."

Evaluation of training often focused on the costs of training rather than actual benefits.

The report suggests a cyclical six-stage evaluation programme.

Measuring The Effectiveness Of Training by M Spilsbury. IES Report 282. From BEBC Distribution, PO Box 1496, Parkstone, Poole, Dorset. Pounds 30.00.

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