Fee waiver for successful A-level appellants

May 8, 1998

Tuition fees will be waived for a further small group of students this year, ministers have confirmed. The waiver will apply to any student who failed to get into university in 1997, the last year of free tuition, but who has secured a place in 1998 after successfully appealing against their A-level grades.

In a letter to Dame Elizabeth Anson, chair of the Independent Appeals Authority for School Examinations, higher education minister Tessa Blackstone said: "We have concluded that it would indeed be inequitable to treat students in this particular category as 1998 entrants." The number of students affected will be "only a handful" of the hundreds who have their appeals upheld, according to the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
Academic Director (Primary) ST MARYS UNIVERSITY, TWICKENHAM
Vice-Chancellor MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Operations Support Administrator CAMBRIDGE ASSESSMENT

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

A keyboard with a 'donate' key

Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration 19 May 2016

Tim Blackman’s vision of higher education for the 21st century is one in which students of varying abilities learn successfully together

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education