Fairweather friend

June 16, 2000

Rain will not stop play at this year's Olympic Games, thanks to scientists from Salford University who will be working with meteorologists from around the world to track the weather during the September event.

Neil Fox and Michael Sleigh from Salford's school of environment and science will be using Gandolf, a short-range forecasting system developed by the Met Office, to monitor weather patterns over Sydney. Gandolf can predict the first signs of rain, thunder or hail more than 90 minutes in advance of a deluge.

"The Olympics attract billions of TV viewers and great amounts of sponsorship, so if the organisers are informed well in advance that fast-approaching rain is going to develop into thunder and lightning over the stadium, it gives them the confidence to act accordingly," Dr Fox said.

As a trial visit to Sydney last autumn was accompanied by warm weather, Dr Fox is hopeful that the athletes will compete in optimum conditions.

"Of course, it would be good for our research if there were a few thunderstorms this year, but I would not wish that on the athletes," he said.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Vice-Chancellor MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Operations Support Administrator CAMBRIDGE ASSESSMENT
Head Chef CAMBRIDGE ASSESSMENT
Vice President, Advancement UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

A keyboard with a 'donate' key

Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education

Door peephole painted as bomb ready to explode

It’s time to use technology to detect potential threats and worry less about outdated ideas of privacy, says Ron Iphofen