European Researchers' Night - discovering the real world of science, 22 September

Brussels, 18 Sep 2006

In labs across Europe, researchers are getting ready to open their doors to the general public on 22 September for the second 'European Researchers' Night.' The aim of the event is to give people the chance to meet researchers and be 'a scientist for a night.' In Brussels, visitors will have the opportunity to meet Asimo, the world's most advanced humanoid robot, or play baseball with the stars at the planetarium.

In Greece, oceanographers will be on the beach, with hands on experiments for determining sand and water quality and the chance to discuss scientific careers with the researchers.

Slovenian researchers will look at 'the physics of love', while in Italy the public will have the chance to travel back in time and visit the world of 65 million years ago.

And if all of this still looks too serious, many of the events involve music and theatre - often performed by the researchers themselves.

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