European 'BioAlpine' convention on neuroscience -- Grenoble, 6 October

September 19, 2006

Brussels, 18 Sep 2006

A European 'BioAlpine' convention on neuroscience with take place on 6 October 2006 in Grenoble, France. The event will bring together European researchers, PhD students and post docs, as well as representatives from start-up companies, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs), and large corporates. The event is divided up into four working sessions, covering the following themes:

- neuro imaging;
- value of-omics in neuroscience;
- ageing and dementia;
- new breakthrough therapies

The event will also include a brokerage event, organised by Innovation Relay Center, SOFRAA, and a poster session

Further information:
http://www.bioalpineconvention.com/

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