ESA's new education site goes live

May 26, 2003

Paris, 23 May 2003

Travelling through space and exploring new worlds fires most young peoples' imagination. ESA's new-look education site for students and teachers, shows how fascination with space can be used to increase interest in all areas of science and technology and increase the number of students who go on to study science, engineering and technology.

To help teachers attract more students to scientific subjects, ESA has redesigned its education site. This site, aimed at students and teachers, is full of information, ideas and classroom tools, all presented in an attractive and user-friendly format.

The site now has dedicated sections for high-school students, higher education and teachers. Students can learn how science affects our daily lives, as well as find information on how to take a trip on the 'vomit comet' as the zero-G airbus is affectionately known. Teachers can find easily downloadable material, information on training courses, and lists of other interesting sites run by ESA's partners.

Space is not only useful for teaching traditional scientific subjects such as physics, chemistry and biology, it can also be used in geography lessons to increase knowledge of our world and its environment, and to inspire art work and help in language teaching.

In preparing the site, ESA's Education Office sought the advice of European teachers to ensure its contents answer their needs. The Education Office is hoping to have a lively two-way dialogue with teachers and students, and is eager to hear new ideas. The site is now available in English but material will soon be offered in other key languages of ESA Member States.

Eduspace in five languages

As part of the drive to provide material in different languages, eduspace, the European Earth observation site for secondary schools, is now available in five languages: English, French, German, Italian and Spanish, with Danish soon to follow.

For teachers searching for inspiration, these two sites are a good place to look for new ideas. For students already 'hooked' on science, come to ESA to find information on career options in space, maybe exploring new planets or helping to protect the one we live on.

European Space Agency ml VED_index_0.html

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