Conference on complex systems in e-business, Slovenia

May 28, 2003

Brussels, May 2003

The Slovenian institute for innovation and technology is to host an international conference on complex systems in e-business from 13 to 17 October in Ljubljana.

The event will provide an opportunity to review current research into the systems based approach to e-business, that is, the relationship between information technologies and the organisational structures that support them.

Topics for discussion include:
- New technologies: grid computing, semantic web, business intelligence;
- New organisational methodologies: innovation management, decision support solutions;
- Formal techniques: human factors modelling, verification and validation procedures;
- Modelling and stimulation: business process simulation, human factors simulation.

For delegates wishing to submit papers, complete manuscripts, in English, can be sent to the organisers for consideration before 1 July.

For further information, please consult the following web address:
http://epos.ijs.si/cseb03/

CORDIS RTD-NEWS / © European Communities

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