Border Agency suspends Glasgow Caledonian’s Tier 4 licence

Glasgow Caledonian University has had its licence to sponsor foreign students temporarily suspended by the UK Border Agency.

April 21, 2011

Last year a routine check on the university as a “trusted sponsor” revealed irregularities among students enrolled on a nursing degree.

Concerns were raised over a number of students from the Philippines, who appeared to be working full time in care homes and attending lectures for just two hours a month despite having a course commitment of 15 hours per week.

Glasgow Caledonian now has 28 days in which demonstrate that it has addressed the problems, or it risks having its Tier 4 trusted sponsor licence revoked altogether.

Phil Taylor, regional director of the UKBA in Scotland and Northern Ireland, said: “Highly trusted sponsors bringing in international students must ensure that they are attending the courses for which they are enrolled and that they are complying with the requirements of the immigration rules.”

Glasgow Caledonian said it had been cooperating with the agency and claimed that UKBA actions had been “disproportionate”.

“We are working with [the UKBA] to fully understand the issues and implement any changes needed as a result. Our duty of care to our students is our absolute priority,” a spokeswoman said.

“Glasgow Caledonian operates at the highest standards and our reputation is hard earned and well known. The Quality Assurance Agency Scotland recently wrote to again express its confidence in the university – the highest judgement it can award in its regular reviews of standards in universities and colleges across the UK.”

hannah.fearn@tsleducation.com

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