Gambling studies

June 16, 2000

Michael Cain of Salford University set up his degree in business economics with gambling studies three years ago "because a consortium of people from the gambling industry came to see us and explained that they wanted to recruit graduates. I'm a mathematician and I teach the theory of bookmaking and betting," he explains.

"We study gambling from an academic viewpoint. Most of the course comprises business economics, but there are also lectures on the psychology and sociology of gambling and the effect of gambling on society as well as sessions on government regulation of the industry. Two visiting experts from Las Vegas come over to give lectures as well."

Cain, who used to teach mathematics and statistics at Aberystwyth, says he is appalled at the emphasis on gambling in lotteries in everyday life:

"People need educating about odds or they wouldn't do so much betting."

This is the first course of its kind outside America and one or two students benefit from a sponsorship scheme that the industry has set up but they all benefit from the outings to a casino, racecourse and greyhound stadium that Cain takes them to each year.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
Academic Director (Primary) ST MARYS UNIVERSITY, TWICKENHAM
Vice-Chancellor MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Operations Support Administrator CAMBRIDGE ASSESSMENT

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

A keyboard with a 'donate' key

Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration 19 May 2016

Tim Blackman’s vision of higher education for the 21st century is one in which students of varying abilities learn successfully together

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education