Reputation is everything 1

In response to the recent article by the vice-chancellor of the University of Buckingham ("The seven deadly sins of the academy", 17 September), I don't care to enter into the debate on the relationship between academics and students, or even the ideology of satire.

What this saga highlights is that universities' public relations and marketing efforts are seriously lacking. However tongue-in-cheek Terence Kealey's comments were, any self-respecting PR professional would not have allowed those words to leave the building. Surely they must have known the furore the article would cause among women's groups and academics?

I understand and appreciate the rights of freedom of speech; where would the press and the country be without them? However, as a PR professional married to an academic, I also understand and appreciate the importance of reputation management.

Higher education institutions are trying desperately to act more like businesses. If they are going to achieve this, they must take a more business-like approach to PR.

Dina Morton, Lindsell Marketing.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Featured Jobs

Academic Partnership Manager LONDON SOUTH BANK UNIVERSITY
Learning Enhancement Manager UNIVERSITY OF DERBY

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

Universities to scale back liberal arts and social science courses

  • David Humphries illustration (24 September 2015)

A Russell Group tagline rap is further proof that we need to reform the academy’s approach, argues Philip Moriarty

  • World University Rankings 2015-2016 methodology

Change for the better: fuelled by more comprehensive data, the 2015-2016 rankings probe deeper than ever

  • World University Rankings

US continues to lose its grip as institutions in Europe up their game

Inspired by previous movement in 1960s, PhD students say that ‘science is not neutral’ and urge scientists to confront their assumptions