On liberty and debate 3

April 14, 2006

Richard Lynn and J. Phillipe Rushton respond as "specialists" to the debate over Frank Ellis (Letters, April 7).

They are correct to point out that studies have found differences between black and white groups in IQ tests, and that there has been much debate about these differences. They allude to work on adoption to support their conclusion that the differences are genetic and state that this has been "accepted for decades by those who have expertise in this subject".

This position is expounded by a small number of psychologists, but it is highly misleading to create the impression that there is some kind of consensus. These findings continue to be hotly debated.

It is vital that these issues are debated, or others may be beguiled by the arguments of Lynn and Rushton.

Tony Ward
Newman College of Higher Education, Birmingham

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