Fired up or wired up?

March 31, 2006

I was wondering whether Terry Eagleton in "Your thoughts are no longer worth a penny" (March 10) was using his tongue (in cheek) or reflecting while scratching his head with a rusty razor? Is the professor teaching his students to ignore the internet (among other novelties such as the phone)?

Most of us are not keen to return to the Stone Age. Instead of protesting as a way of life, we need to harness goodwill, energy and creativity to try to forge a sustainable future for all.

Moshe Gerstenhaber London I entirely agree with Terry Eagleton but don't have his cultural independence. I don't know how his students contact him (mine usually use e-mail), and any attempt to talk down the latest whizzy form of communication is dismissed as old-fashioned.

To create my course descriptions I have to learn a complicated system of internet styles - otherwise my department officers won't accept them. I would like to deal with literary matters - but they are very much secondary to the electronic form of communicating them.

David Nokes

King's College London

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