Employers' offer is not fair game 2

April 14, 2006

Susan Bassnett, a pro vice-chancellor, states that "academic salaries are set to rise with the new framework agreement" ("Spineless except over salaries", April 7). Unless large numbers of individuals are tipped for advancement through job evaluation/role analysis to a higher grade, I suggest this will not happen. As the framework agreement is to provide a springboard structure to equal pay for work of equal value, to address the gender imbalance, I doubt it will resolve the overall pay detriment of academic staff.

Perhaps The Times Higher could plan a survey of higher education institutions after August 2006 to find out what effect this agreement has had on the pay of individuals?

Sandra Jeans
Branch chair, Natfhe Gloucestershire University

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