The forces that power the molecular machine 3

Positive Definite Matrices. First Edition

This book synthesises new research into positive definite matrices. These matrices play the same role in noncommutative analysis as positive real numbers do in classical analysis. The matrices have theoretical and computational uses across a broad spectrum of disciplines - including calculus, electrical engineering, statistics, physics, numerical analysis, quantum information theory and geometry.

Who is it for? Positive Definite Matrices is aimed at established mathematicians, including graduate students, interested in matrix analysis.

Presentation: Logically and concisely presented in a style typical of an advanced mathematical text. The text includes numerous exercises and notes at the end of each chapter.

Would you recommend it? Yes.

David Sands is a lecturer in physics at Hull University.

Positive Definite Matrices. First Edition

Author - Rejendra Bhatia
Publisher - Princeton University Press
Pages - 264
Price - £32.95
ISBN - 9780691129181

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