Introduction to Genetic Analysis

Introduction to Genetic Analysis. Authors Anthony J. F. Griffiths, Susan R. Wessler, Richard C. Lewontin and Sean B. Carroll. Edition Ninth. Publisher Palgrave Macmillan. Pages 800. Price £44.99. ISBN 9780716799023.

May 22, 2008

To help students understand genetics essentials, the authors recreate the landmark experiments and teach them how to analyse data and draw their own conclusions. There are summaries at the end of each chapter, as well as a test section to check knowledge learnt.

Who is it for? Undergraduates in all flavours of genetics.

Presentation - The text is very didactic, the page layout pretty dense and agitated (but maybe Gameboy-reared undergraduates won't mind that).

Would you recommend it? Yes.

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