Get in training for huge student hike

May 2, 1997

MERGER of the further and higher education funding councils could help boost post-16 participation rates to 95 per cent of the population, according to one university vice chancellor.

Brian Roper, vice chancellor of the University of North London, called for a single adult learning council. It would be responsible for overseeing funding allocations according to the educational value added by institutions. He also called for regional collaboration between further and higher education.

Mr Roper, who delivered his pre-publication critique of the Dearing Report at a public lecture on Tuesday, called the present 33 per cent higher education participation rate lamentable and attacked the system for failing the working class.

He said that blue skies research ought to be concentrated in a handful of the UK's world-class research universities. The rest of the sector should concentrate on teaching. Mr Roper dismissed those who say taking more students leads to lower quality.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Lecturer in Islamic Studies QATAR UNIVERSITY
Lecturer in Social Studies QATAR UNIVERSITY

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

  • Boats docked in Port Hercule, Monaco

Richard Murphy praises a bold effort to halt tax-dodging by the 1 per cent

It’s a question with no easy answer, finds James Derounian

  • Man walking, University of Oxford campus, photo negative

Donald Brown shares the experiences that prompted him to talk about ‘institutional racism’ at Oxford

  • Egg timer and clock showing deadlines

Meghan Duffy thinks you can get on in academia without being chained to your desk

  • James Fryer illustration (19 November 2015)

With no time for proper peer review and with grade inflation inevitable, one academic felt compelled to resign