Field rankings for Iran

Data provided by Thomson Reuters from its Essential Science Indicators, January 1999-October 2009

March 4, 2010

 Field PapersCitationsCitations per paper World citations% +/-
1Engineering8,166 24,703 3.034.29-29
2Chemistry13,376 76,506 5.7210.33-45
3Physics4,135 18,964 4.598.62-47
4Psychiatry/psychology 9 1,451 5.2010.45-50
5Mathematics1,912 3,040 1.593.24-51
6Agricultural sciences1,322 4,096 3.106.54-53
7Computer science1,219 1,859 1.533.34-54
8Materials science3,106 8,255 2.666.23-57
9 Pharmacology1,351 6,480 4.8011.52-58
10Geosciences1,045 3,416 3.9.12-64
11Economics/business76 136 1.795.52-68
12Plant/animal sciences3,083 5,880 1.917.31-74
13Immunology3 1,777 5.4321.04-74
14Neurosciences700 3,345 4.7818.62-74
15Environment/ecology869 2,256 2.6010.36-75
16Clinical medicine6,960 21,515 3.0912.36-75
17Biochemistry1,502 6,244 4.1616.67-75
18Molecular biology429 2,471 5.7625.10-77
19Microbiology424 1,371 3.2315.-79
20Space science255 662 2.6013.77-81

Iran has exhibited remarkable growth in its world share of journal articles over the past decade. It has grown fivefold from 2000 to 2008, from 0.17 per cent to 1.02 per cent. Measures of citation impact for the country markedly lag behind this increase in output. The table above ranks fields for Iran by relative citation impact, that is, citations per paper in a field compared with the world’s citations. The percentage above or below the world average is seen in the column far right. All fields exhibit impact below the world average.

The nation focuses its research on engineering and chemistry, producing about 1.4 per cent of the world’s papers in these fields from 2004 to 2008. As a percentage of the country’s output, they account for 41.35% for the same period. This concentration is reflected in the table’s rankings, which show these disciplines to be Iran’s best in relative-citation terms.

The data presented were extracted from the Essential Science Indicators database of Thomson Reuters. Articles are assigned to a category based on the journals in which they were published and our journal-to-category field-definition scheme. For more information: http://scientific.thomsonreuters.com/products/esi

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Board Member BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY (MAIN OFFICE)

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration 19 May 2016

Tim Blackman’s vision of higher education for the 21st century is one in which students of varying abilities learn successfully together

James Minchall illustration (12 May 2016)

An online experiment proves that part of the bill for complying with the Freedom of Information Act is self-inflicted, says Louis Goddard