Disadvantaged targeted for extra medical places

June 16, 2000

The government was expected to exceed its stated target of 1,000 extra medical places by 2005, with the announcement this week of two new medical schools and more medical places at King's College, London.

Prime minister Tony Blair was also expected today to use the King's scheme, where places at the merged Guy's, King's and St Thomas's Medical School will be earmarked for students from disadvantaged backgrounds, as an example of the government's anti-elitism drive. Those involved in setting up the schemes and the Higher Education Funding Council for England, which is funding them, stressed that moves to widen access to medical schools were not a knee-jerk response to the failure of comprehensive student Laura Spence to get into Oxford.

Bids from the University of East Anglia for a medical school in Norwich from the universities of Exeter and Plymouth for a Peninsula Medical School and for more places at King's, were submitted to Hefce and the Department of Health nearly two years ago.

The government allocated 842 of the 1,000 new places in June last year. This week's bids of 247, if accepted, would take the total to 1,129.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Board Member BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY (MAIN OFFICE)

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration 19 May 2016

Tim Blackman’s vision of higher education for the 21st century is one in which students of varying abilities learn successfully together

James Minchall illustration (12 May 2016)

An online experiment proves that part of the bill for complying with the Freedom of Information Act is self-inflicted, says Louis Goddard