A course in how to get on with Germans

June 16, 2000

The Catholic University of Nijmegen, Holland, 30 miles from the German border, is running postgraduate courses for Dutch business people, politicians and civil servants, teaching them how to understand, get on with and do business with their German neighbours.

Under the title Met Meer Succes Naar Duitsland (To Germany With Greater Success), the department of German studies offers six course modules, each dealing with different aspects of German business culture.

Groups of about 20 senior figures from Dutch business and politics spend three days getting to grips with German fiscal law, management and corporate strategy, as well as studying the German economy and the various geographical regions.

But a large part of the course is taken up with tackling the everyday practicalities of dealing with people of a different culture.

Course tutor Jan van Megen said: "The Netherlands and Germany seem very like each other in many ways, in language, mentality and structure. That means that many Dutch people think it's easy because there aren't any differences, but there are."

By inviting guest lecturers from Germany, the course aims to show too that many of the stereotypical images of German officiousness no longer apply and that the country is changing rapidly.

The university also offers inhouse training to companies that want to do better business in Germany.

You've reached your article limit

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 6 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Home secretary says government will support 'best' universities

Man handing microphone to audience member

Academic attainment of disadvantaged students can be improved if they can decide how they are assessed, study claims

Woman drinking tea from saucer

Plugging a multibillion-pound deficit exacerbated by June’s poll result may require ‘drastic measures’, analysts have warned

Italy's gold medallist

New measures to ensure universities are ‘not penalised’ for taking poorer students also outlined for next stage of TEF

Classroom, school

Higher education institutions can and should do more to influence education at a secondary school level, says Edward Peck