A lesson in what the LSE teaches 2

August 25, 2006

Erik Ringmar may be hitting some targets square on the bull's-eye with his comments on the function of universities for employers.

He claims that by picking students from the best universities, employers can acquire "...bright and competitive young men and women who are prepared to subject themselves to hours and hours of mindless exercises under stressful conditions".

This is why, according to Ringmar, a student "would be a fool to pick (London Metropolitan University)... "over the London School of Economics (one of our "best" universities).

There are some areas where students can find work without this type of employer: small business enterprises or companies that have devolved responsibility to small units.

Many of my former communications students at London Met, whose courses required creativity and original research, now work for small companies, or have set up their own businesses, from film production companies to consultancies. This allows them to engage in a variety of genuinely creative enterprises of their own devising.

Perhaps this demonstrates that London Met is a good place to go if you want to find work that is creative and self-initiated, as opposed to going to the LSE to train for a mindless and stressful job.

Mo Dodson. London Metropolitan University

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

Track runner slow off the starting blocks

Lack of independent working blamed for difficulties making the leap from undergraduate to doctoral work

Quality under magnifying glass

Hefce's new standards regime will enable universities to focus on what matters to students, says Susan Lapworth

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Door peephole painted as bomb ready to explode

It’s time to use technology to detect potential threats and worry less about outdated ideas of privacy, says Ron Iphofen

A keyboard with a 'donate' key

Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater