Challenge to decision that enables EURid to reserve galileo.eu domain and refuse other applicants - Case filing T-46/06: Galileo Lebensmittel v Commission

April 3, 2006

Luxembourg, 31 March 2006

Court notice for the OJ

Action brought on 13 February 2006 - Galileo Lebensmittel v Commission
(Case T-46/06)
Language of the case: German
Parties
Applicant: Galileo Lebensmittel GmbH & Co. KG (Trierweiler, Germany) (represented by: K. Bott, lawyer)
Defendant: Commission of the European Communities

Form of order sought

The applicant claims that the Court should:

- annul the defendant's decision to reserve the domain galileo.eu and order the defendant to allow the registry issuing eu. Top Level Domains (EURid) to register freely the domain Galileo.eu.

Pleas in law and main arguments

The applicant applied for registration of the domain 'galileo.eu' as an eu. Top Level Domain. The Registry, EURid, refused that registration on the ground that the domain applied for is reserved for the defendant.

In support of its application the applicant alleges infringement of Article 9 of Regulation (EC) No 874/2004 . (1) In addition, it claims that its rights under the second paragraph of Article 2, the first subparagraph of Article 10(1) and the third subparagraph of Article 12(2) of Regulation No 874/2004 have been infringed.

1 - Commission Regulation (EC) No 874/2004 of 28 April 2004 laying down public policy rules concerning the implementation and functions of the.eu Top Level Domain and the principles governing registration.

The Court of Justice of the European Communities

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