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Found 365 articles

  • My viral Tweet revealed the extent of academics’ email angst

    • 16 Sep 2021
    • Emily Kane

    This article does not require your immediate attention, says Emily Kane

  • Survey: most university staff feel unsafe returning to campus

    • 16 Sep 2021
    • Anna McKie

    Fewer than one in three respondents happy with measures taken to protect employees’ well-being as in-person teaching resumes in major sectors

  • How I became a climate activist

    • 16 Sep 2021
    • Nicholas Till

    Nicholas Till reflects on the path that has led him from research on opera to direct political action

  • Are you ready for the return to in-person teaching?

    • 16 Sep 2021
    • Emma Rees, Irina Dumitrescu, Gabriela Soto Laveaga, John Tregoning, Alice Wickenden Robert Peckham

    A new term is beginning in the northern hemisphere, and many campuses are reopening. But are academics relishing a return to relative normality or fearful of unvaccinated students? And what has the Covid experience taught them about their approach to teaching? Six scholars offer their perspectives

  • Interview with Jemma Wadham

    • 16 Sep 2021
    • Matthew Reisz

    The glaciologist discusses falling in love with ‘ice rivers’, how emergency brain surgery changed her outlook, and the tragedy of global warming

  • Recruitment rebounds in Australian academia

    • 3 Sep 2021
    • John Ross

    Analysis of Australian job advertisements points to recovery, particularly in non-traditional research

  • Progress on gender parity in research ‘set back a year’ by Covid

    • 3 Sep 2021
    • Anna McKie

    Increase in proportion of women submitting preprints was reversed during lockdowns, particularly in Covid-related disciplines

  • Academic freedom can mean refusing to teach material that is too traumatic

    • 3 Sep 2021
    • Rachel O’Donnell

    Keeping going through the pandemic has proved a huge challenge for many working in universities. Being asked to present a story involving an abused child proved a step too far for Rachel O’Donnell

  • Do national research assessment exercises still pass peer review?

    • 3 Sep 2021
    • Jack Grove

    As an international review of the UK’s REF begins even before the assessment panels have done their work, has the exercise’s reliance on rereading published papers finally had its day? Might it be time for metrics? Or something else entirely? Jack Grove looks around the world for options

  • Interview with Saikat Majumdar

    • 3 Sep 2021
    • Joyce Lau

    Ashoka University professor and novelist discusses academic life in the US and India, as well as his next novel, which explores ‘the ethics of education’

  • Pandemic burnout will slow restart of research

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Jenny Pickerill

    Universities must accept that overworked scholars cannot simply resume their research careers overnight, says Jenny Pickerill

  • Peer review is not the best way to promote major breakthroughs

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Donald Braben

    Identifying and seed-funding scientists with ground-breaking ideas is a low-risk, high-reward alternative to traditional grant funding, says Donald Braben

  • UKRI open access policy: a revolution in scholarly communication?

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Anna McKie

    UKRI open access policy: a revolution in scholarly communication?

  • Universities ‘just another knowledge provider’ by 2030: report

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • John Ross

    EY ‘thought experiment’ probes a 2030 where teaching costs have evaporated and universities have lost their primacy

  • Academics speak out on rising tensions at UK-China branch campuses

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Times Higher Education Staff

    Some academics depart China amid allegations of overly strict Covid rules and narrowing space for academic freedom

  • The scourge of managerial blah

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Joe Moran

    Much of the language now used by universities feels like a kind of literary lockjaw that is too dull even to poke fun at. Joe Moran considers the causes and disastrous consequences

  • Is STEM growth really stunting the humanities?

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • Simon Baker

    The narrative that the humanities are haemorrhaging students, funding and political favour is deeply felt around the world. But the evidence of the disciplines’ decline is considerably more nuanced, finds Simon Baker

  • Interview with André Brett

    • 24 Aug 2021
    • John Ross

    Crawford Medal-winning historian on why New Zealand doesn’t have borders, big screens are a good thing and research grant applications are too long

  • Partners’ financial support is holding female academics back

    • 11 Aug 2021
    • Lara McKenzie

    A resulting sense of obligation often leaves women unable to relocate for better or more secure jobs, says Lara McKenzie

  • Universities refuse to ‘slavishly follow’ teacher training plans

    • 11 Aug 2021
    • Anna McKie

    Westminster reforms would force leading providers out of sector, representative body warns