Tribute to Steve Baldwin

March 6, 2001

David Brandon pays tribute to Steve Baldwin, professor of psychology in the School of Social Sciences at the University of Teesside, who was killed in last week's Selby train crash.

I first met Steve Baldwin more than 15 years ago. To hear yesterday that he died in the Selby train crash was an immense shock. Since moving to Scarborough some months ago, I had seen him several times at Teesside University. I last saw him as he strode off purposefully into the distance after a brief chat about everything from his ideas on neighbourhoods, the lack of ethics in the major drug companies and the overdosing of children with behavioural problems, to a brief burst of his experiences as an academic in Australia.

We had worked together on various books and on an ill-fated journal, Care in Place . He had a gentle smile and manner, but underlying them was an intense and restless commitment to radicalising psychology and psychiatry and a great belief in the potential of his students. He had a considerable gift for self-mockery that is ringing in my ears right now.

I will miss him greatly. The shock of his sudden death is still washing over me. My warmest thoughts go out to his family, colleagues and students, who will miss his caring, diligence, innovation and inspiration. We shall all just have to manage the best we can.

David Brandon, Scarborough, North Yorkshire
Emeritus professor, Anglia Polytechnic University

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

Track runner slow off the starting blocks

Lack of independent working blamed for difficulties making the leap from undergraduate to doctoral work

Quality under magnifying glass

Hefce's new standards regime will enable universities to focus on what matters to students, says Susan Lapworth

Woman tearing up I can't sign

Schools and universities are increasingly looking at how improving personalities can boost social mobility. But in doing so, they may be forced to choose between teaching what is helpful, and what is true, says David Matthews

Door peephole painted as bomb ready to explode

It’s time to use technology to detect potential threats and worry less about outdated ideas of privacy, says Ron Iphofen

A keyboard with a 'donate' key

Richard Budd mulls the logic of giving money to your alma mater