Top ten chemists

Data provided by Thomson Reuters from its Essential Science Indicators, January 1999-June 2009

December 3, 2009

 Scientist Papers CitationsCitations per paper
1Stephen L. Buchwald Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US Organic chemistry, organic synthesis171 14,822 86.68
2Chad A. Mirkin Northwestern University, US Materials science, nanoscience218 18,531 85.00
3Robert H. Grubbs (Nobel laureate, 2005) California Institute of Technology, US Organic chemistry, catalysis171 13,884 81.19
4Mostafa A. El-Sayed Georgia Institute of Technology, US Physical chemistry, nanoscience112 8,483 75.74
5Younan Xia Washington University, US Biomaterials and nanoscience140 10,520 75.14
6Gregory C. Fu Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US Organic chemistry, asymmetric catalysis108 8,020 74.26
7George M. Whitesides Harvard University, US Bio-organic/physical organic chemistry, materials 241 17,593 73.00
8Michael Grätzel Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland Photochemistry, solar cells174 11,117 63.89
9Wenbin Lin University of North Carolina, US Supramolecular, materials and catalytic chemistry106 6,685 63.07
10James M. Tour Rice University, US Organic chemistry, nanoscience135 8,472 62.76

Thomson Reuters, Essential Science Indicators, January 1, 1999 – August 31, 2009

The data above were extracted from the Essential Science Indicators database of Thomson Reuters. This database surveys only journal articles (original research reports and review articles) indexed by Thomson Reuters. Articles are assigned to a category based on the journals in which they were published and a journal-to-category field-definition scheme. Papers in multidisciplinary journals, such as Nature and Science, are selectively assigned to a field based on paper-by-paper analysis. Both articles tabulated and citation counts are for the period indicated. Naturally, scientists publishing large numbers of papers have a greater likelihood of collecting more citations than those publishing fewer papers. This ranking is by citations per paper to reveal weighted impact.

A threshold of 100 papers was employed to identify particularly active scientists. For articles with multiple authors, each receives full, not fractional, citation credit. Essential Science Indicators lists authors ranked in the top 1 percent for a field over a given period, based on total citations. For these data, 7,200 authors are listed

in the field of chemistry, so about 720,000 author records were reviewed to obtain the results. Of the 7,200 authors, 3,264 published 100 or more papers during the period surveyed.

For more information, see http://scientific.thomsonreuters.com/products/esi

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