Original features

February 5, 2009

The original women's college at what is now Royal Holloway, University of London, was established by Victorian entrepreneur Thomas Holloway in 1879. The Founder's Building, with its celebrated clock tower, forms the iconic centrepiece.

The building, largely inspired by the chateau of Chambord in the Loire Valley and designed by William Henry Crossland, is notable for the towers and turrets of its exuberant roofline.

Allegorical figures in Portland stone adorn the residential entrances to the north quad. Winged lions guard the base of the octagonal lantern tower, between the dining hall and the kitchens in the central block, while crocodiles and swans adorn the top. Prominent in the two quads are marble statues, made by Count Gleichen, of Queen Victoria, Mr Holloway and his wife, Jane.

The Founder's Building is now used for office space and student bedrooms, with stunning views of the 135-acre parkland campus and beyond. It incorporates the original chapel with its barrel-vaulted plaster ceiling, and also houses the Royal Holloway Collection, a gallery of Victorian art that formed the final part of Thomas Holloway's generous endowment.

Send suggestions for this architectural series to: matthew.reisz@tsleducation.com.

You've reached your article limit.

Register to continue

Registration is free and only takes a moment. Once registered you can read a total of 3 articles each month, plus:

  • Sign up for the editor's highlights
  • Receive World University Rankings news first
  • Get job alerts, shortlist jobs and save job searches
  • Participate in reader discussions and post comments
Register

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Felipe Fernández-Armesto takes issue with a claim that the EU has been playing the sovereignty card in Brexit negotiations

Female professor

New data show proportion of professors who are women has declined at some institutions

John McEnroe arguing with umpire. Tennis

Robert MacIntosh and Kevin O’Gorman explain how to negotiate your annual performance and development review

Man throwing axes

UCU attacks plans to cut 171 posts, but university denies Brexit 'the reason'

opinion illustration

Eliminating cheating services, even if it were possible, would do nothing to address students’ and universities’ lack of interest in learning, says Stuart Macdonald