Love letter

January 13, 1995

Officials at the Department of Environment have put in a spirited bid for the title of most inaccurately addressed letter in higher education history with their missive apologising to Liverpool John Moores University for the cancellation of a recent visit by John Selwyn Gummer, the Secretary of State.

Mr Gummer said he was looking forward to making the visit in the near future, though whether he will actually find the place has to be in some doubt. The apology was addressed to Professor Philip Love, Chancellor, John Moores University, Senate House, Abercromby Square. Nothing much wrong with this apart from the facts that Philip Love is a vice chancellor not a chancellor, that he is at Liverpool University rather than John Moores -- and LJM is to be found at 2 Rodney Street rather than cohabiting with the other place in Senate House. The wonder is that the DoE didn't go for the clean sweep -- and the ultimate insult to any self-respecting Liverpudlian institution -- by relocating them to Manchester.

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