Integration of Biomarkers in Cancer Risk Assessment -- Utrecht, Netherlands, 19-20 October

September 20, 2006

Brussels, 19 Sep 2006

The EU Network of Excellence Environmental Cancer Risk, Nutrition and Individual Susceptibility (ECNIS) has organised a workshop entitled, 'Integration of Biomarkers in Cancer Risk Assessment', to be held in Utrech, Netherlands between 19 and 20 October. The workshop aims to be a forum for the exchange of ideas and new information on various aspects of integration of biomarkers in cancer risk assessment. The workshop will focus on both the epidemiological and toxicological view of how biomarkers could be used in cancer risk assessment. The key word is integration. The aim is to go beyond the use of markers solely for hazard identification or mechanistic support and to explore opportunities of the use of biomarkers in integrated quantitative risk assessment.

The workshop will also include invited speakers from throughout Europe, and a poster and lecture session where delegates can present their work.For further information and to register, go to the event website:

Item source

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

  • Boats docked in Port Hercule, Monaco

Richard Murphy praises a bold effort to halt tax-dodging by the 1 per cent

It’s a question with no easy answer, finds James Derounian

  • Man walking, University of Oxford campus, photo negative

Donald Brown shares the experiences that prompted him to talk about ‘institutional racism’ at Oxford

  • Egg timer and clock showing deadlines

Meghan Duffy thinks you can get on in academia without being chained to your desk

  • James Fryer illustration (19 November 2015)

With no time for proper peer review and with grade inflation inevitable, one academic felt compelled to resign