Informed judgements

June 16, 2000

Karen Gold in her fascinating article on archival secrets ("Pens poised, paper waits", THES, May 19) cited Richard Aldrich as saying that closed bodies of documents are normally unremarkable. It would be nice if we ordinary mortals could check whether this is true, since we lack Professor Aldrich's extraordinary knowledge of the unknown.

Let us see, for instance, more of the documents about Suez, including the "New Doctrine", the British version of the Anglo-American plan to force Egypt to cooperate. Let us also see the documents concerning the Bank of England's refusal of credit facilities to the Spanish Republic in 1936, documents that are closed to the public until 2012. Then, and only then, can we judge whether there is indeed something nasty in the archives.

Will Podmore. London E12.

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Library Systems Manager YORK ST JOHN UNIVERSITY
Chair in Law UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL (MAIN OFFICE)
User Acceptance Testing Technician CAMBRIDGE ASSESSMENT

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

Globalisation

Times Higher Education World University Rankings data reveal the top 200 most outward-looking institutions

Common cactus finch (Geospiza scandens)

Tiffany Taylor on a thought-provoking view of the forces acting to ensure survival

Stressed businessman answering four telephones

Some surveys show faculty putting in at least 60 hours a week, but research casts doubt on whether this is a productive routine

Student asking question during class

University of Reading research finds link between undergraduate satisfaction and ethnicity of lecturers

Level of quality compass

Authors argue this means universities should spend less on senior academics and give promising younger scholars more of a chance