GMO research should be protected and respected, urges French government

May 27, 2003

Brussels, 26 May 2003

Members of the French Senate's commission for economic affairs have unanimously adopted a report detailing the steps necessary to bring about a viable research and regulatory framework for the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

The report notes that biotechnology research has significantly declined in recent years, despite France's reputable scientific base in the field. In an effort to turn the situation around, the report says that it is necessary to award greater recognition and protection to GMO research that has applied the precautionary principle. The report also underlines the need for greater political will and moral support for scientists who carry out research for the development of GMOs.

Furthermore, public and private partnerships should be encouraged, public budgetary allocations re-established and funding for private companies for GMO research increased, urges the report.

In terms of public scepticism concerning GMOs, the report calls for greater transparency and increased dialogue between scientists and citizens. Members of the commission also agreed to the adoption of a bill setting the ethical parameters for biotechnology research.

The report concludes that the implementation of these measures will inevitably lead to the lifting of the moratorium on GM products. To read the report in full, please visit the following web address: http://www.senat.fr/rap/r02-301/r02-301_ mono.html#toc0

CORDIS RTD-NEWS / © European Communities

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