European Gaseous Fuels Training Institute Courses, Hoofddorp, Netherlands

September 21, 2006

Brussels, 20 Sep 2006

The European Natural Gas Vehicle Association (ENGVA) will run a series of three training days at the European Gaseous Fuels Training Institute (EGFTI) in Hoofddorp, the Netherlands between 13 and 14 October 2006. The EGFTI is conceived as a centre of excellence for natural gas, hydrogen fuels, new technologies, markets and politics, with the aim of reaching European transport targets for 2020.

On 13 October will be a generic training day, followed by two in-depth training days on 14 October, the first into Vehicle Technology, and the second into Compressor & Fuelling Station Technology.

For further information, go to the ENGVA website at http://engva.org

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