Arguing About Religion

September 17, 2009

Editor: Kevin Timpe

Edition: First

Publisher: Routledge

Pages: 633

Price: £80.00 and £.99

ISBN: 9780415988612 and 8629

Unlike some other volumes in the Arguing about Philosophy series, this anthology does not aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the subject. Its focus is instead relatively narrow, covering only the main contributions made to mainstream analytic philosophy of the Christian religion during the past 40 years.

Within its stated scope, the anthology is well structured, including contributions on all the main issues, such as arguments for the existence of God, debates on God's nature and attributes, discussions of the problem of evil and of natural theology. These are supplemented by imaginative selections on topics such as the afterlife and the debate between supporters of creationism and of Darwin's theory of evolution.

Who is it for? Upper-level undergraduates and general readers interested in analytic philosophy of religion.

Presentation: Forty-five contributions prefaced by introductions, with suggestions for further reading.

Would you recommend it? Yes, but lecturers may wish to supplement it with readings from other philosophical and religious traditions.

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