Awards

June 7, 1996

ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY AND THE INSTITUTE OF BRITISH GEOGRAPHERS. Founder's Medal: John Woods, professor and dean of the graduate school of the environment at Imperial College, for contributions to oceanography.

Patron's Medal: John Thornes, specialist on Mediterranean environments, former vice president of the society and professor at King's College London, for his contribution to geomorphology.

Victoria Medal: Ronald Abler, executive director of the Association of American Geographers, for his contribution to human geography and enhancement of links between British and American geography.

Busk Medal: Alexey Yablokov, chairman of the Interagency Commission on Environment Security for the Russian National Security Council and member of the International Board of Advisers for Earthwatch, for his contribution to environmental issues in Russia.

Cherry Kearton Medal: Alastair Fothergill, head of the BBC Natural History Unit.

Murchison Award: R. Dodgshon, professor at the University College of Wales for his contribution to the study of historical geography.

Back Award: Rory Walsh, senior lecturer at the University of Wales, Swansea, for his contribution to tropical hydrology and geomorphology.

Cuthbert Peek Award: J. Duncan, professor at University of Syracuse and fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge, for his contribution to the development of cultural geography.

Gill Memorial Award: Philip Rees, professor at the University of Leeds and coordinator of the Census Programme of the Economic and Social Research Council and Joint Information Systems Committee, for his contribution to population geography.

Ness Award: Alastair Rogers, major in the Royal Marines, for organisation of research expeditions.

Edward Heath Award: David Drakakis-Smith, professor at the University of Liverpool, for contributions to the geography of developing areas.

Geographical Award for support of expeditions was awarded to Tate and Lyle.

Alfred Steers Dissertation Prize: awarded to Anna Mallet, University of Durham and Adrian Manning, University of Edinburgh.

ROLEX AWARDS FOR ENTERPRISE

The 1996 awards recognised science-education projects which demonstrate innovation and originality in the fields of science exploration and the environment.

The five winners were: Gilbert Clark, director Telescopes in Education, task manager at the California Institute of Technology; Royce Hall, ophthalmologist, currently supervising the building of Monduli Juu Eye Hospital in Tanzania; William Rosenblatt, director of Recovered Medical Equipment for the Developing World and assistant professor of anaesthesiology at Yale University School of Medicine; Georgina Herrman, reader, University College London; Sanoussi Diakite, currently teaching mechanical engineering at the Lycee Technique Industriel Maurice Delafosse in Dakar.

Noticeboard is compiled by Lynne Williams.

For further information see also NetGazette on http//thesis.newsint.co.uk.

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