Polite request 1

March 31, 2006

The article "Shameless students put tutors in e-mail hell"

(March 24) is correct in noting the increased informality with which students associate and communicate with university staff. While I appreciate that this would make some people very uncomfortable, I believe it is hardly the worst crime a student might commit.

But the poor student who has been quoted requesting feedback prior to a resit is polite. The perfectly reasonable and sensible request for feedback as a core tool of learning indicates that this is a student who is hoping to improve their performance in their resit of the module.

I commend the student for requesting feedback. That this is considered inappropriate or rude is the real story.

Ben Vulliamy. Sheffield

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