Low pay, high morals 4

March 31, 2006

While I agree with the general thrust of Lewis Elton's argument ("Some dumb insolence might get their ear", March 24), I suspect that administrators and bureaucrats in UK universities will view it as a touching example of academic naivety that they can exploit.

"Strategic compliance" and "dumb insolence" are routine attitudes in all bureaucracies simply because they are indifferent to matters of substance. These people care not about what you believe, only about what you do.

Perhaps the situation can be reversed by the identification of a common bureaucratic and administrative enemy. The Universities and Colleges Employers' Association has admitted that a third of the income from top-up fees will be spent on implementing the new pay framework. The commercial sector would not tolerate this. That academics are happy to do so shows that they are both dumb and dumber.

Jeremy Valentine

Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Featured Jobs

Assistant Professor: Data Visualisation NANYANG TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY

Register to continue  

You've enjoyed reading five THE articles this month. Register now to get five more, or subscribe for unrestricted access.

Most Commented

  • Boats docked in Port Hercule, Monaco

Richard Murphy praises a bold effort to halt tax-dodging by the 1 per cent

It’s a question with no easy answer, finds James Derounian

  • James Fryer illustration (19 November 2015)

With no time for proper peer review and with grade inflation inevitable, one academic felt compelled to resign

  • Lisa Mckenzie, Class War Party candidate, Chingford

Anarchist academic reflects on what her recent brush with the law says about threats to academic freedom

  • Worker checks thin-film silicon solar module, Truebbach

Asia doubles representation while European countries face varied performance