Have view altered by money

Global Finance and Financial Markets

May 30, 2003

Every so often a book appears that makes a teacher reflect on how a subject should be introduced to the beginner. Global Finance and Financial Markets, an overview of the world of international money and investment, falls into this category.

In nine short chapters, plus a glossary of terms, it provides an overview of money and interest, the role of banks, stock-market investments, derivatives, exchange rates, interest rates, global finance, risk and uncertainty, and how the international financial system is evolving in the 21st century. While each chapter merits a book of its own, the author has sought, successfully, to provide the reader with the essentials for each topic. For example, the chapter on futures and options avoids mathematical complexities through a conceptual exposition of how options are valued and their practical use.

While not a traditional textbook as such (although there are end-of-chapter exercises), it is particularly suitable as a primer for introductory courses in international finance or for participants on executive development courses, where there is a need to ensure that participants have a basic understanding of the

international financial system and instruments. Though outstanding in its approach, it is regrettable that the text does not have more illustrations.

Peter Moles is lecturer in finance, School of Management, University of Edinburgh.

 

Global Finance and Financial Markets: A Modern Introduction. First edition

Author - Ferdinand E. Banks
ISBN - 981 02 4326 X and 43 8
Publisher - World Scientific
Price - £34.00 and £18.00
Pages - 317

Already registered?

Sign in now if you are already registered or a current subscriber. Or subscribe for unrestricted access to our digital editions and iPad and iPhone app.

Have your say

Log in or register to post comments

Most Commented

Elderly woman looking up at sky

A recent paper claims that the quality of researchers declines with age. Five senior scientists consider the data and how they’ve contributed through the years

Otto illustration (5 May 2016)

Craig Brandist on the proletarianisation of a profession and how it leads to behaviours that could hobble higher education

smiley, laugh, happy, funny, silly, face, faces

Scholars should cheer up and learn to take the rough with the smooth, says John Tregoning

Eleanor Shakespeare illustration 19 May 2016

Tim Blackman’s vision of higher education for the 21st century is one in which students of varying abilities learn successfully together

James Minchall illustration (12 May 2016)

An online experiment proves that part of the bill for complying with the Freedom of Information Act is self-inflicted, says Louis Goddard