First Impressions

April 14, 2006

This week's competition, in which you have to identify a book from its opening sentence, is from an English novel by a writer born of Polish parents:

"He was an inch, perhaps two, under six feet, powerfully built, and he advanced straight at you with a slight stoop of the shoulders, head forward, and a fixed from-under stare which made you think of a charging bull."

Entries, including postal address, should be sent to First Impressions, The Times Higher , Admiral House, 66-68 East Smithfield, London E1W 1BX, faxed to 020 7782 3300 or emailed to theschat@thes.co.uk  

The winner receives a £25 book voucher. The closing date is April 18.

The winner of last week's competition, who identified V. S. Naipaul's Mr Stone and the Knights Companion , was Phil Askham, of the faculty of development and society, Sheffield Hallam University.

THES (TSL Education Ltd) and its associated companies may from time to time wish to process, or disclose your data to approved third-party companies, in order to monitor our service and send you future promotions. If you do not wish us to do this, please notify us by writing 'No promotions' on your entry.

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